Skip to main content

Welcome to Peer Review Practice

With more than 30 years of peer review experience, ORAU shares tips, tricks, and lessons learned to continue building a better scientific enterprise through grant proposal peer review

Thank you for visiting the first of many posts on ORAU’s Peer Review Practice page. The vision of this page is to serve as a resource for all on the best practices and tips and tricks associated with peer review.   

Although similar in process to journal peer review, grant peer review focuses on the allocation of funding, not on the publication of journal articles. Both review types lend to the quality of scientific research and future writings on this page will cover differences on these two types of peer review including topics such as reviewer honoraria, the review process, review outputs, purposes, and how both types of peer review are critical in scholarly communication and in the dissemination of scientific findings.

Other topics you can look forward to over the coming year include the history of peer review, the value of peer review, how peer review reduces risk, what qualities make the best reviewers, how to recruit these top experts, how to engage Early Career scientists in the peer review process, what interrater reliability actually means, the globalization of peer review, as well as reaction posts pertaining to peer review as seen in the media.

So who am I and why am I sharing this with you? Well, for the last decade, I used my Master’s in Information Science to identify experts to serve as grant peer reviewers. Yes, I’m a librarian, a title that is more widely recognized than information scientist and is often looked upon in a kinder light. But, more importantly, I’m a librarian who has read thousands and thousands of research proposals submitted to dozens of state, federal, and international entities and can tell you the pain points in the process. Finally, we created this page to address a noticeable gap in the larger peer review community. Because there is no formal peer review education program and since peer review is a critical and federally-mandated step in allocating federal research dollars, it is imperative that data, information, and knowledge on the peer review process and outcomes be shared and discussed for the greater good.

I aim to post new content about every other week with my insider view of peer review allowing for new lessons to be shared, differences in processes to be explored, as well as standards required for peer reviews. Have ideas on future articles?  Have feedback on what you have read? Interested in learning how ORAU can assist you in your peer review process?  Please reach out! peerreview@orau.org or (865) 241-7544.

Welcome to the conversation,

Meredith Goins

Meredith P. Goins, Group Manager in ORAU’s Scientific Assessment and Workforce Development, has supported peer review for the last decade and is currently focusing her Ph.D. studies on the peer review process and the important role subject matter experts play in the process.

Why Peer Review Practice?

Why Peer Review Practice?

“We created this page to address a noticeable gap in the larger peer review community. Because there is no formal peer review education program and since peer review is a critical and federally-mandated step in allocating federal research dollars, it is imperative that data, information, and knowledge on the peer review process and outcomes be shared and discussed for the greater good.”

-Meredith P. Goins, Group Manager
ORAU’s Scientific Assessment and Workforce Development program